Vitamin D is essential for good health

Vitamin D - Not Just for Bones!

Vitamin D - Not Just for Bones!

Vitamin D is both a nutrient we eat and a hormone our bodies make. It is a fat-soluble vitamin that has long been known to help the body absorb and retain calcium and phosphorus which is critical for building bone. Studies also show that Vitamin D helps control infections, reduce inflammation, and reduce cancer cell growth. Many of the body’s organs and tissues have receptors for vitamin D, which suggest important roles beyond bone health, including but not limited to the following...

Immune Health:

Vitamin D is critical to having a good immune system for better overall health, less disease and longer life. Vitamin D can boost the immune system, fight infection and kill bacteria, kill funguses, and kill viruses.  At least one billion people globally have Vitamin D Deficiency which puts people at greater risk for many infectious diseases, flus, respiratory infections, death, and maybe COVID-19.  Deficiency is very prevalent because most people do not get enough sunshine each day to produce enough Vitamin D, called the "sunshine vitamin," and because the RDA for Vitamin D and diet intake may be way too low.

It is highly recommended you have your healthcare provider test your Vitamin D levels to determine whether you have a deficiency in this extremely important nutrient.  There are many types of Vitamin D supplements available for the treatment of Vitamin D deficiency.  We suggest Vitamin D3 being it is the naturally occurring form of the vitamin and it may raise Vitamin D levels more effectively.  The recommended dose of Vitamin D depends upon the nature and severity of the Vitamin D deficiency.

Cancer: 

The high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, combined with the discovery of increased risks of certain types of cancer in those who are deficient, suggest that vitamin D deficiency may account for several thousand premature deaths from colon, breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer annually,  A study designed in Norway involving over 115,000 diagnosed cases of breast, colon, and prostate cancers concluded that a high level of vitamin D3 at the time of diagnosis, and thus, during cancer treatment, may improve prognosis of the three cancer types.  Another interesting part of the study suggested that diagnoses during summer and fall, the seasons with the highest level of vitamin D3, revealed the lowest risk of cancer death.

The first study designed to assess the association of breast cancer and sunlight exposure was done by Northern California Cancer Center and found that high exposure to sunlight was associated with a 25–65% reduction in breast cancer risk among women whose longest residence was in a state of high solar radiation.  Other measures of vitamin D exposures in the study included residential solar radiation, sun-induced skin damage, and dietary intake of vitamin D.

Researchers at Harvard just announced that the five year survival for patients with early stage, non-small cell carcinoma of the lung was almost three times better in those with evidence of the highest vitamin D levels compared to those with the lowest. Five-year survival for those with the highest levels approached 80%!

Heart Disease:

Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to diminish heart function, distort heart muscle structure, and induces plaque formation by increases smooth muscle in the coronary arterial wall.  Coronary heart disease is known for mainly being associated with lifestyle factors such as diets high in sugar and fat, smoking, and high alcohol intake. Most of the time, health conscious adults regularly monitor only their glucose levels, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Research is suggesting now that Vitamin D levels may be being overlooked when assessing causative factors linked to cardiovascular disease. A study analyzing a database of over 250,000 individuals who had heart attacks maintained by the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction, found that infarctions surged by 53% during sun-deprived winter months compared to summer.

A study that looked at patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) found correlation with low serum vitamin D levels and other high inflammatory markers. The low vitamin D status can explain alterations in minerals and electrolyte metabolism as well as myocardial dysfunction in the CHF patients, and it may therefore be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of CHF.

Another study published in American journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology studied 10,000 Danes and found that those with low levels of vitamin D were 64% more likely to have a heart attack. Plus, they had a 40% higher risk of ischemic heart disease, a 57% increased risk of early death, and an 81% higher risk of dying from heart disease.



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Cognitive Function:

The brain relies on vitamin D receptors for protection against the things that can damage it. Receptors for vitamin D have been found in many parts of the brain. Receptors are found on the surface of a cell where they receive chemical signals that direct a cell to do something. Vitamin D receptors in the brain can influence the way one thinks and acts. Scientists have found that in people with Alzheimer’s and Dementia, there are fewer vitamin D receptors in a part of the brain called the hippocampus, which is involved in forming memories.

Another research group which conducted a study that observed over 1,600 seniors for six years found that those who were severely deficient in vitamin D were more than twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s and dementia than those who had adequate levels.13 These results were twice as much as was anticipated.

A study conducted for over 75 years, found that participants who had been diagnosed with dementia had a lower vitamin D average than the other groups. Researchers also conducted cognitive tests that evaluated episodic memory, semantic memory, visual perception and executive function. Those tests showed that participants with lower levels of vitamin D demonstrated a greater decline in both cognitive ability and episodic memory.

Testing is KEY:

Don't guess about your Vitamin D levels. In fact, if you’re low in Vitamin D, chances are you are deficient in other nutrients as well and there may be other health conditions that can cause low levels of vitamin D. Screenings for these are part of our routine tests. Finding out your nutritional status and getting a good baseline is recommended at any age. At Science Based Wellness, we will guide you down the right path with an individualized plan that is customized specifically towards your needs. Let us help you with a safe natural option today that will enhance your health tomorrow.

Until next time, stay healthy!

Dr. Steven Nickels, DC, NMD


Learn how Vitamin D can offer protection from viruses in the video below:



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